Less Waste Life: Cloth Nappying On The Go

Less waste with a little one…cloth nappies, wipes, muslin for dribbles, a wet bag for dirties, water bottle and a couple of spare sleepsuits (secondhand as ever, baby clothes are in such abundance secondhand as they are barely worn!). ⁣

I think we have cracked a good system with cloth nappying now, I carry washable wipes dry (we use a mix of @cheekywipes and ikeas plain super cheap cotton facecloths) and just wet them with my water bottle or a sink as needed as I found taking them out wet if they werent used that day they’d go a bit smelly. The wetbag with dirties then just gets chucked in the washer at home 👍🏻⁣

We have Rory in full time nappies and Marley in a nappy overnight, and we do about 1 nappy load every other day, so it is extra washing but in the grand scheme of things a pretty small inconvenience, and I think worth it to send no nappies to landfill and to never run out and have to haul ass out for some 😂. The money advice service also estimates around a £1500 saving over 2.5 years even with laundry costs included 😮 (and not including getting nappies passed on, or selling them after) so its pretty substantial on your wallet too. ⁣

If you are considering cloth nappying your local council may also offer an incentive scheme (ours offers £25 back on a £50 spend) ⁣and @mamalinauk is a brilliant resource for all things cloth nappying (see the highlight on her page for links!)👍🏻 L x

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Less Waste Life: A Sustainable Wardrobe

Lets talk clothes! In the years before we simplified and got eco thrifty, so much of my clothing I would never reach for because it didn’t really fit me right or feel comfortable on my changing mama body. I’d buy things just because they caught my eye in the supermarket or fast fashion shops, then barely wear them. Or I’d buy for a future me that wasn’t really me, or practical for my lifestyle. ⁣
While I was pregnant I pretty much sold and donated everything but a few things that fit, I love and reach for all time, so now I’m slowly building a little capsule wardrobe (I have one small chest of drawers for all my clothes) that is simple, and secondhand or ethically made wherever possible. ⁣

I’m mainly a charity shop girl, with eBay as my backup and haven’t bought new clothes in a long while, but after having a super hard time finding anything to wear that fit and I could feed in after having Rory my mama bought me some @lucyandyak dungarees as a gift and oh my goodness they are the comfiest things I have ever owned, I adore their ethics as a company (will write more on this soon & a few ways to save ££ on buying them!) and I am just going to live in them forever. ⁣

I found this Topshop denim jacket a few months ago in a charity shop for £1 which is handy for matching all my summer clothes. Caitlyn also repping the forever self chosen mismatched thrifted wardrobe and not giving a damn what anyone thinks look, whilst showing me her wobbly tooth😂⁣ Anyone else living with a capsule wardrobe or trying to move towards it? I love it for less money, laundry, time shopping, and choices in a morning! ⁣⁣
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Are you interested in seeing more of what I pick up / how we shop secondhand / for the kids etc? I’ll never be a fashion blogger 😂 (hello how awkward i am in every photo of me!) but I think we need voices repping #buyless #secondhand and #sustainablefashion where we can, in a world of Primark hauls and tonnes of clothes ending up in landfill each year (and you’ll never find judgement in this space cos I’ve certainly been that person, and we are just here learning together & doing what we can in our individual circumstances ❤) L x ⁣⁣

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Less Waste Life: Freezing In Glass

Potato, lentil and spinach curry, with an extra batch of sauce heading to the freezer for a mama’s too tired to cook day ❤ Old jars make great #plasticfree storage containers – old jars are just good for everything aren’t they? 😂

We put all hot food leftovers / sauces etc into glass now, and will re-use our old big plastic tubs until they are broken for freezing fruit we grow or buy cheaply to chop and freeze for smoothies.⁣

To defrost stuff in jars quickly you can stick it in a bowl of hot water too (I use the little half of my sink) which also elimimated the use of a microwave in our house – win 👍🏻 I’ve started work on a new little project for a revamp of my blog today, with lots more tips and recipes and I absolutely can’t wait to share it with you!
L x

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Less Waste Life: Bar Soap

Bought some of my friends @greenfigsoapstudio soaps for gifts ❤ They are all #vegan and zero waste and smell absolutely amazing. I’d previously been buying bulk liquid soap, thinking of bar soap as the horrible smelling itchy stuff we had as a kid 😂 but these have totally got me converted and they are all I will use once I’m out of liquid, love them! An awesome small business run by a lovely friend to support if you can ❤ L x

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Less Waste Life: Crafting & Throwaway Plastics

The girls made Harry, Ron and Hermione with loo roll inners 😊

So many craft kits and supplies are essentially disposable and so often made of plastic, I look at things now and I can’t quite comprehend how the little plastic bits they sometimes bring home from a group / party or the packaging for something I’ve bought takes so much to produce then could take over 1000 years to break down / become microplastics that contaminate our oceans (and they can be bought for less £1?!). We can throw them away, but theres no real away, is there?

I’ve just been reading the UN global assessment report (link in comments) about the rapid decline of the earths natural life support systems and it is a sobering read, highlighting the need for drastic remedial action.
While changes undoubtedly need to happen on a huge scale and with policymakers and governments, at an individual consumer level we can lobby to make our concerns and voices heard through groups like @extinctionrebellion and mirror the changes needed higher up by starting to take our own action in our homes and communities in beginning changing our consumption habits if we are priveleged enough to be able to.
I find it easy to become anxious and overwhelmed and feel like individually we obviously make no difference, but seeing so many people passionately speak up and begin doing what they can, and making small changes where we can too, gives me an inkling of hope for a tomorrow where we are kinder on the earth ❤🌍 L x

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Less Waste Life: Growing Microgreens

Little indoor microgreens garden ❤ Our supply of homegrown greens all year, so much value (so full of nutrients and sooo delicious!) in the tiniest space with such a small amount of input.⁣

We have a tray on the utility room windowsill to catch any water and within that we re-use old shallow plastic raspberry containers, and some mushroom containers (cut down) with a few holes in the bottom for drainage. ⁣

They only need a really small amount of compost, the seed is sown thickly on top, watered and covered for a day (stack them or I use a dark towel), then left on a sunny windowsill and within a week or 2 you can harvest the most tasty, super nutritious greens! I’ll post a step by step with photos on my blog soon.

They are absolutely delicious on pasta, salads, pizza, sandwiches (basically anything!). Rocket microgreens are my absolutely favourite, but we also grow kale, radish, broccoli and cabbage – our seeds were from Premier Seeds Direct on eBay (suuuper cheap – 99p delivered for most packs plus discounts for more). Do you grow microgreens? Would you give them a go? L x

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